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Adult Epidural Stimulation »

VOP-Kent

 

EPIDURAL STIMULATION IN ADULTS

Epidural stimulation is used experimentally by surgically implanting an electrode array over the lower spinal cord to activate the neural circuits to better understand how the human spinal cord executes movement, standing and walking. Effects have been reported by research participants in these studies related to other consequences of spinal cord injury such as heart, pulmonary and bladder function. We have ongoing studies to better understand these research findings.

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EPIDURAL STIMULATION IN STANDING

From animal and human studies, we know that the spinal circuitry can interpret sensory feedback from the feet and legs, sending instructions back to the lower limb muscles; all without cortical involvement. The spinal cord epidural stimulation mimics the signals that the brain normally transmits to initiate movement. The combination of sensory feedback and appropriate stimulation parameters enable the spinal circuitry to generate a coordinated activation of lower limb muscles to achieve standing.

ONGOING STUDIES

RECOVERY OF FUNCTION, HEALTH & QUALITY OF LIFE FOR PEOPLE WITH PARALYSIS

Funding: The Leona M. & Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust

The major goal is to restore motor function and quality of life in patients with spinal cord injury using epidural stimulation and locomotor training therapies.  Our epidural stimulation research and training core studies the recovery of function, health and quality of life for people with paralysis.  This grant has also supported 2 research participants to complete epidural stimulation studies.

Enrollment status: Currently recruiting 1 research participant (considering male and female candidates),  3 research participants enrolled, 2 research participants completed

 

EFFECTS OF ACTIVITY DEPENDENT PLASTICITY ON RECOVERY OF BLADDER AND SEXUAL FUNCTION AFTER HUMAN SPINAL CORD INJURY

FundingNational Institute of Health

The major goal of this research is to promote the recovery of urogenital function through the use of effective rehabilitative strategies alone as well as in combination with epidural stimulation. This work will help increase our understanding of how the lumbosacral spinal networks responsible for walking and standing also interact with the circuitry controlling bladder and sexual function after injury. The importance and ultimate impact of this research is to improve treatment options and enhance quality of life, as bladder and sexual dysfunction consistently rank as top disorders affecting health and well-being after SCI.

Enrollment statusCurrently recruiting research participants (considering male and female candidates), 8 research participants enrolled, 5 research participants completed

 

 

 

CARDIOVASCULAR RECOVERY WITH EPIDURAL STIMULATION

FundingThe Craig H. Neilsen Foundation

The major goal of this research is to demonstrate that epidural stimulation (ES) can be used to recover significant levels of autonomic control of cardiovascular and respiratory function as well as the ability to voluntarily control leg movements below the injury level.

Enrollment status: Currently recruiting 3 research participants (considering male and female candidates),  1 research participants enrolled

 

Completed STUDIES

SPINAL EPIDURAL ELECTRODE ARRAY TO FACILITATE STANDING AND STEPPING AFTER SCI

FundingNational Institute of Health

This research grant has been completed.  The major goal of this research was to investigate the combined effects of stand and step (locomotor) training with electrical stimulation of the spinal cord in individuals who have had a complete SCI.

Enrollment status: Closed

PRIMARY RESEARCHERS

Susan Harkema, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Claudia Angeli, Ph.D.


 

 

 

 

 

 

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Enrico Rejc, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Maxwell Boakye, M.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alex Ovechkin, MD, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Charles Hubscher, Ph.D.

charles-hubscher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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